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Lee Bay

Primary day anchorage for visiting the RMS RHONE. The yellow buoys are reserved for dive boats.

RMS RHONE

RMS RHONE

Scotsman James MacQueen had not yet seen his 20th birthday when he was already a sugar plantation manager on the island of Grenada (inexplicably pronounced gren-ay’-dah).

By 1822, while still in his twenties, MacQueen had saved a tidy sum and traveled throughout the Caribbean basin and Central America. In his travels, he observed that there was no organized or scheduled shipping or mail service anywhere in the area. If, for example, one was on St. Kitts in 1830, there was no scheduled way to get back to England.

A local island vessel might get you to St. Thomas and then passage might be available within a few weeks to San Juan, a busier port; but there was no way to know when a passenger vessel might call on San Juan. Further, if there was a vessel bound for London, it might be on the first leg of its voyage and may be bound for Rio or Buenos Aires before turning for home.

As important as scheduled cargo and passenger service was, mail communication was paramount. Knowing when a recipient would receive a dispatch and when a reply might arrive was important. Such a level of communications did not exist except in England itself...>>Full Story

Lee Bay is the primary anchorage for visiting RMS RHONE. It is exposed and only suitable for day anchorage.

It can get busy during the day with dive and tour boats coming and going.

If your crew members are not divers, they can still snorkel over the RMS RHONE and look down 20 feet below the surface to the propeller poking up from the stern and the 310-foot hull extending down 75 feet below.

Note: Orange buoys are National Park mooring buoys and are available only to permit holders.

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